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Turkey Korma
Food + Drink Recipes

Turkey Korma Recipe for Thanksgiving Leftovers

Published November 22, 2018 by

Don’t know what to do with all that leftover Thanksgiving turkey? Try this turkey korma recipe for a twist on a traditional Indian dish.

By Chrissy Barua

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Thanksgiving comes and goes, but the leftovers stay! This twist on chicken korma uses that leftover bird in a far cry from the parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme flavorings that may have graced your plate the day before.

Toasting the spices at the start strengthen their flavor, and Greek yogurt pumps the protein and makes it creamy without the richness of the previous day’s feast. Serve this with cauliflower rice to keep it even lighter and to add a little extra veg, which is never a bad thing!

Turkey Korma

Turkey KormaChrissy Barua for SEEN

Serves 4

Total time:  20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 tablespoon olive or vegetable oil

6 cardamom pods, crushed

2 bay leaves

1 cinnamon stick, about 1 ½-inch

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon garam masala

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 onion, diced (~1 cup)

1 jalapeno, diced, seeds removed

1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

1 tablespoon minced fresh garlic

3-4 cups diced leftover turkey, skin removed

1/4 cup Greek (any fat percent)

3 tablespoons creamy almond butter

1 cup turkey or chicken stock

1 cup fresh cilantro, diced

1/2 cup slivered, toasted almonds

1 lime, juiced

4 cups cauliflower rice, to serve

DIRECTIONS

In a small bowl, mix together the yogurt, stock and almond butter until smooth. Set aside.

In a deep skillet, add the oil, cardamom, bay leaves and cinnamon. Cook for about 2 minutes until toasted. Add the onion, jalapeño and cloves and let cook until the onion is soft, about 4 minutes. Add the ground cloves, garam masala, ginger and garlic and cook about 2 minutes. Add the diced turkey.

Add the yogurt mixture and simmer about 10 minutes until the turkey is warmed through. Add the lime juice and cilantro, and serve over a bed of cauliflower rice, your favorite type of regular rice or with a side of naan.

Chrissy Barua

Chrissy Barua is the author of her food and travel blog “The Hungary Buddha Eats the World,” a global culinary journey she started over six years ago in an attempt to make everyday food as interesting as the food she eats on her travels. She collects recipes from anywhere she can find: in-flight magazines, newspapers, books or, if she’s lucky, a grandmother willing to share a family secret. In real life, she’s an attorney based in Ann Arbor and spends her days supporting the basic sciences at the University of Michigan. She moonlights as a recipe developer for various online sources and is always dreaming of where to take her next vacation. Follow her antics on Instagram @thehungarybuddha, and check out her website thehungarybuddha.com for recipes, tips, tricks and travel adventures.

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